Madison Town Spotlight

The Connecticut shoreline is full of beautiful sights, charming shops, unbeatable seafood restaurants, and historic buildings. The town of Madison is one of those shoreline towns. 

Situated on the Long Island Sound, Madison was first settled in 1641 and is part of New Haven County. The town of just over 18,000 residents is heavily invested in building community. 

Recently, we sat down with Tom Banisch, First Selectman of Madison, and Erin Duques, who is running for Board of Selectmen, to gain insight on what projects are currently taking place in Madison. 

Madison Highlights

The location of Madison offers a little bit of everything. Located on the Long Island Sound, the town has several beaches, including Hammonasset Beach State Park, Connecticut’s longest public beach. For those that prefer biking and hiking, there are trails throughout the town. In addition, downtown is filled with locally-owned shops and restaurant and boast a strong public school system.

Millennials and Baby Boomers agree on Downtown Living

When it comes to real estate, millennials and baby boomers want the same things: walkable locations. Walkable downtown locations, like in Madison, are extremely desirable for people of all ages. People are selecting communities with a vibrant downtown over other areas in the state. 

Tom Banisch told us, “The best part of Madison’s downtown is transit-oriented opportunities.” The train station is right downtown, making it easy to walk to the station for your commute. 

Sidewalk Projects

Since walkability is important to residents, there are several sidewalk projects taking place in Madison. Currently, the Texas Walkway, which runs from the train station to downtown, is being replaced. In conjunction with that project, a sideway is being put in on Bradley Road, connecting Route 79 to Wall Street. Next year, a third sidewalk project go along Route 79 from Woodland Road.

While people are already walking these routes to downtown, the sidewalk projects will make it safer for residents and visitors. 

Small Business and Community Growth

In addition to walkability, downtown Madison is filled with opportunities for community gatherings and to support local economic growth. The Scranton Memorial Library is being rebuilt, with an additional 35,000 square feet. This will include community space for events, meetings, art shows, as well as business incubator space. 

Local businesses in Madison are as unique as the town itself. RJ Julia Booksellers hosts events every week, and includes a cafe, bookstore, and gift shop. People come from all over the state to visit the bookstore. 

Downtown is filled with shops and restaurants that promote community. For example, in the fall, local businesses put out scarecrows, making it enjoyable for children to walk around and see all of the decorations. When businesses and people come together to support each other, that is what makes a town special.

Are you buying or selling in Madison?

 Contact Us! 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *